Translation Disclaimer

Child Care as a Profession

More than half of the U.S population consists of working parents with children under the age of 6 and require child care services outside of their home. The Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS) understands that choosing a safe, quality childcare provider or facility can be an overwhelming task for parents.  VDSS is committed to providing parents with the highest quality child care programs in Virginia, staffed with caring, knowledgeable, nurturing and dedicated individuals.  As a child care professional, you can be a part of Virginia’s commitment to providing safe, quality child care!

As a child care professional you most likely work for a child day program. Child day programs are defined as regularly-operating service arrangement for children where, during the absence of a parent or guardian, a person or organization has agreed to assume responsibility for the supervision, protection and well-being of a child under the age of 13 years for less than a 24-hour period.

In Virginia, there are two types of child day programs for which you may work: child day centers (center-based) and family day homes (family-based).

Child Day Centers

Child day centers provide care for (i) two or more children under the age of 13 years in a facility that is not the residence of the provider or of any of the children in care or (ii) 13 or more children at any location.

Family Day Homes

Family day-homes provide care in the residence of the provider or the home of any of the children in care for up to 12 children under the age of 13 years, not including the provider's own children and any children who reside in the home, when at least one child receives care for compensation.

Requirements for Becoming a Child Care Professional

As a child care professional in Virginia, you will be required to meet certain standards to ensure your level of knowledge and competency. Qualifications will vary based on the type of program.

For Licensed Child Day Centers

What educational qualifications are needed to work in a child day center in Virginia?
Qualifications vary for program directors, program leaders, and aides. Program directors can meet one of the following criteria with education in a child-related field:

  • Graduate degree
  • An endorsement or bachelor’s degree
  • College credits: 48 semester hours with 12 being in a child-related field or 72 quarter hours with 18 being in a child-related field
  • Two years of programmatic experience with one year in a supervisory capacity and other advanced educational requirements
  • Three years of programmatic experience with one year in a supervisory capacity and a high school completion or equivalent  

For additional requirements read Part III Staff Qualification and Training in the Standards for Licensed Child Day Centers. Click Here

Business Resources

Low Interest Loan Program

The Virginia Small Business Child Care Financing Program (CCFP) is designed to assist Virginia child care providers in obtaining financing for fixed asset needs and educational materials.

Association for Early Learning Leaders

The Association for Early Learning Leader’s goal is to strengthen the knowledge, skills and abilities of early care directors, owners, emerging leaders and other early learning professionals to ensure quality child care programs for young children.

Childcare/Program Director’s Training

CHD 270 - This Community College course examines the skills needed for establishing and managing early childhood programs. Emphasizes professionalism and interpersonal skills, program planning, staff selection and development, creating policies, budgeting, and developing forms for recordkeeping.

Center Director Responsibilities

Managing a child care center is a big job. It takes someone who loves children, understands people, and can handle the business side of child care.

Early Childhood Investigations Webinars

An ongoing series of free webinars that offer new ideas and insights to early childhood educators, directors, managers, and other professionals who work in early care and education.

Virginia Shared Services Network

The Virginia Shared Services Network is a program of Child Care Aware of Virginia. It’s goal is to assist child care centers and family child care providers to support and strengthen the quality of early learning settings and to improve financial stability.

What are the annual training requirements?
Staff members are required to have a minimum of 16 clock hours of training annually in areas relevant to their job responsibilities.

What certifications are required?
  • Current certifications in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first aid appropriate to the age of children in care are required for at least one staff member who is on the premises during the center’s hours of operation and also one person on field trips and wherever children are in care.
  • Current certification in Medication Administration Training (MAT) is required for staff members that administer prescription and/or non-prescription medications. Click here

For Licensed Family Day Homes

What educational qualifications are needed to be a family day home provider in Virginia?
Providers are required to have (i) a high school diploma or the equivalent or (ii) evidence of having met the requirements for admission to an accredited college or university.

What are the annual training requirements?
In addition to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first aid certification, providers are required to have a minimum of 16 clock hours of training annually in areas relevant to their job responsibilities.

What certifications are required?

  • Current certifications in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first aid appropriate to the age of children in care are required for providers.
  • Current certification in Medication Administration Training (MAT) is required members for providers that administer prescription and/or non-prescription medications. Click here

For additional requirements read Part III, Personnel and VI, Caregiver Training in the Standards for Licensed Family Day Homes. Click Here


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Become a Licensed Provider

What are the benefits to becoming a licensed provider/program?

As a licensed provider, you have a competitive advantage over unlicensed and unregistered providers. Your licensed program is held to a higher standard that provides accountability to health and safety standards enforced by the Commonwealth of Virginia. 
Becoming a licensed provider creates opportunities to:

  • Become established as a professional in your field
  • Demonstrate a commitment to providing a safe and healthy environment for children
  • Have an assigned licensing inspector who is available to answer questions and provide technical assistance
  • Receive increased subsidy payments for eligible children in your care
  • Be better prepared to voluntarily participate in Virginia Quality,  the Commonwealth’s child care quality rating and improvement system (QRIS)
  • Be included in a searchable, free listing of your center or family day home on the VDSS and Child Care Aware of Virginia websites and/or referral services
  • Use your licensure status as a marketing tool to solicit and educate prospective parents
  • Influence parents with online health and safety inspection reports
  • Access relevant, up-to-date training and resources
  • Be connected to the front line of federal/state child care news and provider requirements
  • Be eligible to participate in the USDA food program
  • Be proud of the quality child care you are providing to your community

How do I get my program licensed with the state?

Applicants are required to attend the Pre-licensure Orientation-Phase 2 training provided by the Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS) that includes an overview of the Code of Virginia, regulations, completing the application, licensee responsibilities, inspections/role of the licensing inspector, and program requirements. Applicants are provided with specific information on health and safety standards and required background checks.
Applicants are encouraged to contact their regional licensing office or call the toll-free licensing information line at: 800–543–7545 if they have any questions about licensing and the licensing process.

For more information on becoming licensed, you can also contact your regional licensing office.

Note: A general business license to operate from the county within which the provider conducts business is not the same as a child day care license obtained from the Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS), which holds the child day care provider accountable to the health and safety standards set forth by the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Licensure for a Child Day Center (CDC)
  1. View the online presentation titled, Phase I: Pre-Application Training for Child Day Centers (this is highly recommended, but not required)
  2. Review the information located under the following sections. Click here
    • Regulations, Technical Assistance & Code References
    • Background Investigations
    • New CDC Applicants
  3. Contact your regional licensing office to register for the class titled, Pre-Licensure Orientation – Phase 2 for Licensed Child Day Centers. In this class, licensing inspectors will focus on the Standards for Licensed Child Day Centers and answer any of your questions.
  4. Submit a complete application for licensure - Part I, Part II and Part III. All required information, fees and attachments must be included with the application for the licensing office to process your application.
  5. Prepare for your facility inspection. After you have attended Pre-licensure Orientation - Phase 2, and submitted a complete application package, a licensing inspector will contact you to schedule an inspection of your facility.

Licensure for a Family Day Home (FDH)

  1. View the online presentation titled, Phase I: Pre-Application Training for Family Day Homes (this is highly recommended, but not required)
  2. Review the information located under the following sections. Click here  

    • Regulations, Technical Assistance & Code References
    • Background Investigations
    • New FDH Applicants
  3. Contact your regional licensing office to sign up for the class titled, Pre-Licensure Orientation for Licensed Family Day Homes – Phase 2. In this class, licensing inspectors will focus on the Standards for Licensed Family Day Homes and answer any of your questions.
  4. Submit a complete application for licensure - Part I, Part II and Part III.  . All required information, fees and attachments must be included with the application for the licensing office to process your application.
  5. Prepare for your home inspection. After you have attended, "Pre-licensure Orientation-Phase 2" and submitted a complete application package, a licensing inspector will contact you to schedule an inspection of your home.

Information about Virginia’s Licensed Child Care Regulations

The current rules and regulations for licensed child care programs are found at the links below. Virginia’s licensed programs must meet the standards for their program (family day home or child day center), as well as requirements in General Procedures and Information for Licensure, and Background Checks for Child Welfare Agencies.

Information about Inspections

The Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS) inspects licensed child care programs prior to operation, bi-annually, during program development, and in response to complaints. The bi-annual mandated inspections are unannounced. Licensing inspectors conduct a participant-centered inspection using tools and strategies to help providers understand the extent to which their program is compliant with Virginia regulations.

What should I expect during an inspection visit?

Information regarding inspections is found within the Protocol for Inspections Licensed Child Day Programs.

There are 6 basic components of an inspection:

  1. Entrance Conference – Inspectors introduce themselves briefly, explain the inspection process, and ask for any items needed to conduct the inspection.
  2. Tour – Inspectors walk through the building(s) directly after the entrance conference to observe activities and personal interactions, talk to children and staff, examine the physical plant, and check on general health and hygiene issues.
  3. Interactions and Interviews – Inspectors speak to children, parents (either during or after an inspection), staff members, and interview the program director to gather information on compliance with Standards, especially those relating to care and services to children.
  4. Observations – In order to thoroughly assess compliance with Standards, observations will begin from the moment the inspector drives up to the building until the conclusion of the inspection, when the inspector leaves the property. Inspectors pay special attention to the interactions between staff and children, the execution of the program’s internal policies and procedures, and the learning and recreational activities observed.
  5. Documentation Review – Inspectors conduct a focused examination of child and staff records, key Standards, and information gathered during interviews and observations.
  6. Exit Meeting – Inspectors review the results of the inspection with the provider, listen to and discuss any disputed findings and/or comments about the inspection process, provide consultation, and request a plan of correction for any violations found during the inspections.

Application Process for Becoming A Child Care Provider

Child Day Centers

New Applicants - To ensure timely processing, the applicant must submit a complete application to the Regional Licensing Office 60 days prior to the facility’s planned opening date. A complete application includes the following: 1) “Part I: Initial Applicant” and all required attachments; 2) “Part II: Program Addendum to the Application” and all required attachments; and 3) the licensing fee. Submission of an incomplete application will delay the review process. If you are a new child day center applicant, you will need to complete these forms:

 

Licensing Forms for Child Day Centers

Renewal Applicants – To ensure timely processing, the applicant must submit a complete renewal application to the Regional Licensing Office at least 60 days prior to the expiration date of the current license. A complete renewal application includes the following: 1) “Part I: Renewal Application” and required attachments; 2) “Part II: Program Addendum to the Application” and required attachments; and 3) the renewal fee. No fee is required for a renewal application following a conditional license.

If you are a current provider seeking renewal of a child day center you will need to complete these forms:

Additional forms related to child day center operations are available. Click here

Family Day Homes

New Applicants - To ensure timely processing, the applicant must submit a complete application to the area Licensing Office at least 60 days prior to the facility’s planned opening date. A complete application includes the following: 1) “Part I: Initial Application” and all required attachments; 2) “Part II: Program Addendum to the Application” and all required attachments; and 3) the licensing fee. Submission of an incomplete application will delay the review process.

If you are a new family day home applicant you will need to complete these forms:

Licensing Forms for Family Day Homes

Renewal Applicants – To ensure timely processing, the applicant must submit a complete renewal application to the Regional Licensing Office at least 60 days prior to the expiration date of the current license. A complete renewal application includes the following: 1) “Part I: Renewal Application” and required attachments; 2) “Part II: Program Addendum to the Application” and required attachments; and 3) the renewal fee.   No fee is required for a renewal application following a conditional license.

If you are a current provider seeking renewal of a family day home you will need to complete these forms:

Visit the VDSS website for additional forms regarding family day homes.

Background Checks, Fingerprinting

Virginia’s Background Check Regulation covers the following areas:

  1. Sworn Statement or Affirmation
  2. Criminal History Record Check
  3. Central Registry Search Instructions

Sworn Statement
A sworn disclosure or affirmation is a statement completed by a person attesting to whether he/she has ever been: (i) convicted of or the subject of pending charges of any crime within the Commonwealth or equivalent offense outside the Commonwealth, or (ii) the subject of a founded complaint of child abuse or neglect within or outside the Commonwealth. Additionally for family day homes, the person affirms if he, or if he knows that any person who resides in the home, has a sex offense conviction or is the subject of a founded complaint of child abuse or neglect within or outside the Commonwealth.

Criminal History Record Check
The criminal history record check is the process of the Virginia Department of State Police to generate a criminal record report on a person. The report will be either the criminal history record report or the criminal record clearance. The criminal history record report shows all convictions. The criminal record clearance shows whether the person is guilty of:

  1. A barrier crime, and/or
  2. Any other felony not included in the definition of barrier crime unless five years have elapsed since the conviction.

Central Registry
The Virginia Child Abuse and Neglect Central Registry is mandated by the Virginia Child Protective Law. The search of the central registry is a check to determine if the person has ever been the subject of a founded complaint of child abuse or neglect in Virginia.

National Criminal Background Check
Effective July 1, 2017, all licensed child day centers and licensed family day homes will be required to obtain national fingerprint-based criminal history record checks.  More information on these requirements will be provided closer to the implementation date.
Additional guidance and procedures regarding background investigations include a barrier crime list; a list of convictions requiring registration in the Sex Offender and Crimes Against Minors Registry; and Technical Assistance on Background Checks for Child Welfare Agencies


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Become a Subsidy Provider

The Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS), in partnership with the local departments of social services, administer the Child Care Subsidy Program which provides financial assistance to eligible families to help pay a portion of the cost of child care so they can work or participate in education or training programs.  Program services are child-centered and family focused and support the broader objective of strengthening families’ goals of self-sufficiency and enrolling children in quality early childhood programs. Approved Subsidy providers partner with VDSS to carry out the objectives of the program.

How to Become a Subsidy Provider

The Child Care Subsidy Program provides financial assistance to eligible families to help pay for the cost of child care so they can work or attend educational or training programs. The Child Care Subsidy Program services are child-centered and family-focused and support the broader objective of strengthening families’ goals of economic self-sufficiency and quality early childhood programs for their children. Participating families may select any legally operating child day care facility approved to participate in the program.

INTERESTED IN BECOMING AN APPROVED VENDOR OF SUBSIDIZED CHILD CARE

Step 1:  Submit Application for Enrollment to be a Provider of Subsidized Child Care

Print, complete and return the Application for Enrollment to be a Provider of Subsidized Child Care and provide your current private pay Child Care Rates to begin the approval process. 

Step 2:  Application is assigned to the appropriate agency for review

After receiving the application, it will be reviewed and once deemed complete; the applicant will be provided information about the Virginia Preservice Training for Child Care Staff and based upon the program type, assigned to the appropriate agency for processing. 

Step 3:  Processing

The assigned agency will contact the applicant and depending on program type, will schedule attendance at the next available Subsidy Orientation Session or provide the applicant with a New Vendor Approval Packet. NOTE:  The completed New Vendor Approval Packet must be submitted to the VDSS Child Care Subsidy Program within 60 days of receipt.

Step 4: On-site Inspection

Once the completed New Vendor Approval Packet is received the applicant will be contacted by a licensing representative from the Division of Licensing Programs and a pre-approval inspection will be scheduled at a mutually convenient time. The brochure ‘Health and Safety Inspections’ can help you prepare for this inspection.

Step 5: Vendor Approval

After receipt of (a) a complete New Vendor Approval Packet, (b) documentation of completing the Virginia Preservice Training for Child Care Staff, and (c) the results of the subsidy monitoring inspection, the applicant will either be approved or denied.

If approved, the Child Care Subsidy Program will create an electronic Vendor Agreement for your program. The Vendor Agreement will be email to the vendor. The vendor will review the agreement, accept all terms, and electronically sign the agreement before returning to the subsidy program.

Local departments of social services will use the completion of the Vendor Agreement as verification of the vendor’s participation in the Child Care Subsidy Program. NOTE: A vendor cannot be reimbursed for services provided until a signed Purchase of Service Order (POSO) dated within the start and end dates of the Vendor Agreement has been created.

Benefits to Becoming a Subsidy Provider

Any legally operating child care provider may choose to become an approved Subsidy Provider!
Subsidy Providers are choosing to make a difference for children, families and the community by serving low-income families who are working or attending an approved school or training program. 
Becoming a Subsidy provider creates opportunities to:

  • Make a difference by delivering services that allow parents to work and stay (or become) self-sufficient
  • Make a difference by providing healthy, safe and quality environments where children spend a significant number of hours each week, which has a direct impact on their development and well-being
  • Receive payments for the Subsidy children you serve through convenient and regular direct deposits to your banking account or a debit card
  • Use your approved Subsidy Provider status as a marketing tool to solicit and educate prospective parents
  • Influence parents with online health and safety inspection reports
  • Access relevant, up-to-date training and resources
  • Receive federal and state child care news and updates through email blasts

Subsidy Payment Levels

The Child Care Subsidy Program does a statewide survey every 3 years to gather information about the rates charged by child care providers.  This information is used to help set the payment rates for the Subsidy Program.  In general, licensed providers are paid by the Subsidy Program at a rate higher than unlicensed providers. 

  • Level 1 - Unlicensed providers are considered to be “Level 1” providers.  Voluntarily registered family day homes, religious exempt centers, certified preschools, local government approved recreation programs and in home providers who are not licensed or regulated by VDSS are included in this group. 
  • Level 2 – Licensed providers are considered to be “Level 2” providers.  Providers who are licensed by VDSS or are approved and/or operated by a Licensed Family Day System, the Department of Defense, or under local ordinance according to §15.2-914 of the Code of Virginia are included in this group. 

The payment amounts received by providers for services provided depend on the locality, the age of the child, the provider level and also the type of care (center or family day home).  The payment rates and amounts for all Subsidy providers are determined by VDSS.  Level 2 providers are eligible to receive payment for absences, holidays and registration fees. 

Vendor Agreements/Inspection Requirements

Notices



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Virginia Quality Logo Virginia Quality

Virginia Quality is the state’s voluntary Quality Rating and Improvement System. Quality Rating and Improvement Systems are a proven method to improve the quality of child care and early learning programs. Virginia Quality awards quality levels to child care and preschool programs based on four quality standards and best practices:

  1. The education and qualifications of the staff
  2. The curriculum or intentional teaching approach the program uses to guide children’s learning
  3. The learning environment
  4. Teacher-child interactions

Benefits of Becoming a Virginia Quality Program

  • Public recognition with other high quality child care or preschool programs in Virginia
  • Objective assessment of your program (based on Nationally recognized best practices/ or standards)
  • A clear and realistic path to improve your program quality
  • Inclusion in a free, searchable listing of Virginia Quality providers
  • Use your Virginia Quality status as a marketing tool to reach prospective parents
  • Access to quality improvement supports such as training and technical assistance
  • Receive federal and state child care news and updates through email blasts
  • The satisfaction of offering high quality services to children and families in your community

How do I become a Virginia Quality Program?

Virginia’s Quality Rating and Improvement System is available statewide, in a variety of settings. For profit, nonprofit, faith-based, VPI and Head Start programs can participate. Programs that are interested in participating in Virginia Quality should contact the regional lead agency in their area.


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New Provider Requirements

There are several new requirements for family day home providers.

Family Day Home Licensure Threshold Change

Effective July 1, 2016, licensure threshold limits will beupdated. Family Day Home providers are now required to obtain a state-issued license from the Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS) when caring for more than 4 children (this does not include the provider’s biological children or other children who legally reside in the home).  If the family day home provider cares for more than 4 children under the age of  2 , including the provider’s biological children and children who legally reside in the home, the family day home provider must possess a state-issued licensed or a voluntarily registered certificate from VDSS.

*Note: If all are the biological children of the provider, meaning related to the provider by blood or marriage, the home is not required to be licensed.

Written Notice to Parents, Unlicensed Family Day Homes

Effective July 1, 2015, if a family day home provider does not have a state-issued license or a voluntarily registered certificate from VDSS, parents must be notified, in writing, that the home is not regulated by VDSS, and a link to the VDSS website is provided for parents to obtain additional information regarding licensure. (Code of Virginia, Section 63.2-1704.1)

Sex Offender Prohibited in a Family Day Home

Effective July 1, 2015, per § 63.2-1727 of the Code of Virginia, it is unlawful to operate a family day home  if the provider or any household member, employee, or volunteer in the family day home has been convicted of any offense that requires registration in the Sex Offender and Crimes Against Minors Registry. It is recommended but not required that providers search the Virginia Sex Offender Registry to determine if an individual is listed, and print out the results of the search. If you are unsure if a crime requires registration, visit the VDSS website for a list of convictions that are required to be reported.


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Training & Professional Development

A skilled and well-trained workforce is essential to providing high-quality early care and education services to children and their families. Through professional development, child care providers acquire knowledge and skills needed to plan and implement quality early learning experiences. If you are a child care provider looking for professional development opportunities, the Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS) offers a variety of training, education, and resources to help you earn the continuing education and training needed to be successful in the early childhood and school-age care workforce.

What Training Does the State Offer?

The Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS) Division of Child Care and Early Childhood Development collaborates with partners to provide training opportunities throughout the state for child care providers in both classroom-based and distance learning formats.

Virginia Preservice Training for Child Care Staff - Virginia’s Health and Safety Training Course
This FREE online course introduces child care staff to important health and safety information and addresses other topics such as child development, inclusion, and Virginia’s Subsidy and Licensing Programs.   Participants will earn a 10-hour training certificate upon completion and a CEU! Completion of the training is required for all staff who work in a program that participates in Virginia’s Child Care Subsidy Program, but all Virginia child care staff are welcome and strongly encouraged to take this FREE course. Please check with your employer to determine if your program participates in Virginia’s Subsidy Program and you are required to complete the training. 
The FREE, 10-hour course covers the following topics:

  • Emergency Preparedness
  • Prevention and Control of Infectious Disease
  • Food and Allergic Reactions
  • Shaken Baby Syndrome/Abusive Head Trauma
  • Safe Sleep and SUIDS Prevention
  • Safe Spaces
  • Transportation Safety
  • Handling and Storage of Hazardous Materials
  • Medication Safety
  • Inclusion of All Children
  • Healthy Teeth for Children
  • Recognition and Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Foundations of Child Development and Approaches to Learning
  • Introduction to Virginia’s Child Care Subsidy Program and Benefits of Program Licensure

The Virginia Department of Social Services is partnering with Pennsylvania State University’s Better Kid Care Program to bring this course to you.  For more information, see the Frequently Asked Questions below.

To access the course, click on “Start Training” below. If you already have an account with Better Kid Care, sign in to On-Demand, and select “Virginia Preservice Training for Child Care Staff” at the bottom of the alphabetical listing.  If you have not used Better Kid Care’s website before, you will need to register as a new user first, and then choose the Virginia Preservice Training from the alphabetical listing.

 

VDSS Endorsements

The VDSS Early Childhood and School-Age Endorsements are designed to provide a comprehensive foundation of knowledge for working with children of specific ages (infants & toddlers, preschool, or school-age.) The endorsement programs are a collaborative effort between the VDSS, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS), and the Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA). These Endorsements are valuable as entry-level credentials for employment in the field of early childhood or school age care and, in combination, meet the training requirements for the Child Development Associate credential.

The five Endorsements include the following:

All Endorsements require successful completion of 12 classroom-based or online courses (except where noted above) which can be taken in any sequence. For more information about each Endorsement, click on the endorsement program title.

Distance Learning Classes

The Virginia Department of Social Services has partnered with the Community College Workforce Alliance to offer a variety of online child care training classes year round.

Child Development Associate (CDA) Credential

Read-A-Book Program

This is a distance learning, self-study program that allows early childhood professionals to earn training clock hours by completing lessons with children's literature books, or reporting on pre-approved books about early childhood education and child development.

For additional information, contact jodir@va.childcareaware.org or 804-285-0846.

Better Kid Care Directors’ Training

Better Kid Care offers lessons designed specifically to address the professional development needs of center directors with content on program leadership and administration.

Classroom-Based Courses

Virginia’s Community Colleges offer short term certificate programs and 2-year Associate Degrees in Early Childhood Development.

  • Early Childhood Certificate

    A certificate is a short term educational program consisting of a minimum of 30 semester hours.

  • Early Childhood Development Degrees

    The Virginia Community Colleges offer an Associate of Applied Science degree for child care providers. 

Childcare/Program Director’s Training

CHD 270 - This Community College course examines the skills needed for establishing and managing early childhood programs. Emphasizes professionalism and interpersonal skills, program planning, staff selection and development, creating policies, budgeting, and developing forms for recordkeeping.

Find Training Classes (TIPS Calendar)

The TIPS (Training Information for Provider Success) Calendar lists early childhood professional development opportunities, offered by private, non-profit, and governmental organizations throughout Virginia and Washington, D.C. The calendar may include classes for home-based and center-based child care providers, Head Start staff, home visiting professionals, early intervention staff, local school division teachers and staff, as well as others who work directly with children.
The TIPS Calendar is not intended to give detailed information on an event. Individuals must contact the sponsor for details and registration.

Are There Scholarships to Help Me Pay for Education?

The Virginia Child Care Provider Scholarship Program (VCCPSP) offers current and future child care providers a foundation in the care and development of children. Administered by the Virginia Department of Social Services, the Program allows early educators to attend undergraduate (credit) courses at Virginia's accredited colleges.
The Virginia Association for Early Childhood Education (VAECE) is an organization that acts and speaks on behalf of all young children in Virginia. The organization has established an annual scholarship project to assist providers working with young children to obtain their Child Development Associate (CDA) Credential.  VAECE will reimburse half of the direct assessment credentialing fee, or half of the renewal fee paid by candidates.
Project Pathfinders is a new initiative administered by the Virginia Early Childhood Foundation designed to increase the skills of early childhood professionals by accessing community college coursework and credentials. All applications must be submitted through their online system.

Career Pathways for Early Childhood and Out-of-School Time Practitioners

Virginia Career Pathways for Early Childhood and Out-of-School Time Practitioners is a resource that recognizes the hours of informal training, formal education and credentials of practitioners in the field of early childhood and school-age care. The purpose of the Career Pathways is to help practitioners plan their training, education and career development goals so they may be well-prepared to educate, nurture and meet the needs of young children and their families.

IMPACT Registry

IMPACT is Virginia’s early childhood professional development registry. This voluntary tool documents and recognizes the professional achievements of practitioners and trainers who work in the early childhood education and school-age care profession within the Commonwealth of Virginia.

The IMPACT Registry awards a Professional Development Certificate designating your Placement Level on the Career Pathways for Early Childhood and Out-of-School Time Practitioners. Each level represents increased training and education, indicating a commitment to early childhood education, and creating a pathway to career growth.

Ready to make and IMPACT?

Before you get started, you may want to review the following documents: Click here to join now
Impact Registry Logo

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Resources

Other Training and Development Opportunities

Better Kid Care
Better Kid Care's On Demand Distance Education system provides professional development online anytime you are ready to learn! Get started using On Demand with a video tutorial, review the lesson listing, and read frequently asked questions.

Child Abuse and Neglect – Recognizing, Reporting and Responding for Educators
This training module prepares Virginia teachers who are mandated by law to report suspected child abuse and neglect.

Child Care Aware of Virginia
Offers training courses designed to help early childhood professionals complete annual training requirements and acquire required training hours for the CDA credential or in-service training.

Children with Special Health Care Needs
This webinar explores the key role caregivers play in supporting children with special health care needs.

Multihazard Planning for Childcare
FEMA has a free course designed to help child care providers develop emergency preparedness plans.

First Aid and CPR
The American Red Cross offers training in First Aid, CPR, and/or AED.

Medical Administration Training
Child care providers who work in licensed or regulated child day programs and who give prescription medications to children are required by the code of Virginia to satisfactorily complete the MAT course.

Virginia Early Intervention eLearning Center - Social Emotional Development of Young Children:
The VA EI eLearning Center is designed to provide practitioners with high quality, interactive professional development on early intervention topics. Each module is available as a free resource and results in a certificate of completion.

Guidance & Resources

Emergency Preparedness
Learn how to plan, organize and practice emergency procedures so that you will be able to keep children safe and calm if an actual emergency arises.

Family and Community Engagement
Learn how to enhance parent, family, and community engagement practices in your program. The Early Childhood Learning & Knowledge Center (ECLKC) has a wealth of resources, strategies, assessments, newsletters, PD opportunities and more for building strong partnerships with families.

Fostering Healthy Social & Emotional Development in Young Children
Tips for Early Childhood Teachers and Providers

NAP SACC
Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care works with early care and education programs to set preschool children on a lifelong path to healthy eating and activity. Go NAP SACC is full of resources, including self-assessment instruments and training opportunities, to improve the health of young children.

Project Hope - Virginia’s Program for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth
These resources provide an overview of issues related to the education of children and youth experiencing homelessness and resource to support these children and their families.

Screening: The First Step to Getting to Know a Child
The Early Childhood Health and Wellness portal on the Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center (ECLKC) offers facts and tools about screening for early childhood staff and families.

Virginia Infant & Toddler Specialist Network
The ITSN provides on-site services that include individualized consultation, targeted training, classroom-focused mentoring, and feedback as well as resources and materials related to increasing the quality of care provided to infants and toddlers.

Virginia Shared Services Network
The Virginia Shared Services Network has resources, articles, training materials and networking opportunities related to the classroom, working with families, and program administration.

Publications and Resources

Competencies for Early Childhood Professionals
Virginia must have a highly skilled workforce that embraces a spirit of life-long learning and continuous quality improvement. To articulate the skills and competencies desired in that workforce, Virginia’s Competencies for Early Childhood Professionals outline standards for competent practice, identifying what early childhood professionals must know, be able to do, and care about to provide quality early care and education.

Milestones of Child Development
Virginia’s Milestones of Child Development is a comprehensive resource for family members and providers who care for young children. They focus on the observable behaviors that highlight the learning and development that occurs from birth to kindergarten, as well as recommended strategies to provide optimal learning environments and experiences. The Milestones are organized into 6 areas of children’s growth that encompass the dimensions of children’s overall development:

  • Social and emotional development
  • Approaches to learning
  • Language and literacy
  • Cognition and general knowledge
  • Fine arts, and
  • Physical development and health

Director’s Toolbox
This publication is designed to assist directors in meeting the standards for Licensed Child Day Centers. It also guides directors and new staff members through the process or orientation. Included is a wide variety of recommended and required sample and model forms.

Family Child Care Tool Kit
This publication is designed to assist family child care providers in providing quality care and education to the children they serve. It contains guides and outlines, sample policies and procedures, forms and checklists, and resources about health and safety and child development. Click here to see the updates made in 2013.

Emergency Preparedness for Child Care Providers
This document provides a wealth of resources and tips for emergency preparedness – including preparation, response and recovery.

Trauma Toolkit
Recent advances in understanding how early childhood experiences shape the way the brain works over a lifetime, reveal how critically important the caregivers’ job of caring for children is. The trauma toolkit is designed to support caregivers on their journey towards trauma sensitivity. The toolkit offers a brief overview by topic, specific tools that can be used with children, and a brief summary on where to find more information.  

Professional Associations

Virginia Association for Early Childhood Education
VAECE is an organization that acts and speaks on behalf of all young children in Virginia. VAECE seeks to promote the professional growth of persons working with young children and improve the availability and quality of developmental and educational services and resources for young children.

Virginia Child Care Association
VCCA is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing support and guidance for Virginia’s private, licensed early childhood education community with up-to-date information and resources to help stay on top of the industry and prepare for future growth and success.

Virginia School-Age Child Care Association
Virginia School-Age Child Care Association (VSACCA) is a professional organization dedicated to advancing the quality of programs for children and youth by developing, linking and supporting school-age child care professionals.

Virginia Partnership for Out-of-School Time
VPOST is a statewide  public-private partnership dedicated to developing and expanding academic, social, emotional, and physical supports and services to school-age children and youth across the Commonwealth of Virginia during the out-of-school time hours – before-school, after-school, vacation periods, and summer.

Virginia Alliance of Family Child Care Associations
The Virginia Alliance of Family Child Care Associations promotes professional development for family child care providers through quality child care and early childhood education conferences and training, sharing of educational resources, and collaboration with local associations.

National Association for the Education of Young Children
NAEYC provides research-based ideas to inspire and inform your work with young children.

Virginia Cross Sector Professional Development Leadership Team
VCPD offers a great listing of early childhood professional development web sites that provide a broad array of early childhood professional development resources

Council for Professional Recognition
The Council for Professional Recognition promotes improved performance and recognition of professionals in the early childhood education of children aged birth to 5 years old.

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